You asked: Is drawing a tattoo a sin?

What does the Bible say about drawing tattoos?

The Bible warns against tattoos in Leviticus 19:28 (Amplified) which says, “Ye shall not make any cuttings in your flesh for the dead, nor print or tattoo any marks upon you: I am the Lord.”

Is it a sin to make a tattoo?

The verse in the Bible that most Christians make reference to is Leviticus 19:28, which says,”You shall not make any cuttings in your flesh for the dead, nor tattoo any marks on you: I am the Lord.” So, why is this verse in the Bible?

Can Christians draw tattoo?

While there’s no speculation that Christianity forbids tattoos, there’s also no permission saying that it’s permitted. A lot of people like to make an analysis of the Biblical verses and draw their conclusions, so finally, tattooing is an individual choice.

What does Jesus say about tattoos?

Per Leviticus 19:28, “You shall not make gashes in your flesh for the dead, or incise any marks on yourselves.”

Is piercing your ears a sin?

What the New Testament does discuss is taking care of our bodies. Seeing our bodies as a temple means to some that we should not mark it up with body piercings or tattoos. To others, though, those body piercings are something that beautifies the body, so they don’t see it as a sin.

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What does the Bible say about art?

God had shown Moses the design (Exodus 25:40); and by filling the artists with His Spirit, God guaranteed that the artwork produced would truly represent Him——not the ideas of man. Once the Tabernacle was finished and the Glory of God occupied it, the holy objects inside were not to be seen again by man.

Is a tattoo a sin Catholic?

I’ll cut to the chase: There is nothing immoral about tattoos. Mother Church has never condemned them, and neither can I. It is one of those areas where a Catholic must follow his or her conscience.

Is it a sin to smoke?

The Roman Catholic Church does not condemn smoking per se, but considers excessive smoking to be sinful, as described in the Catechism (CCC 2290): The virtue of temperance disposes us to avoid every kind of excess: the abuse of food, alcohol, tobacco, or medicine.